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How Late Can a Manager Give Rota?

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  • How Late Can a Manager Give Rota?

    Hello,

    I work in the events industry and I've been with my current employer since June 1st 2015 and have a permanent, full-time, term time only contract with them.

    I currently work 7 days a week, up for 40 hours per week with TOIL for any hours worked over this to be taken as my manager dictates.

    I have scheduled times and days for some work but most of my work and hours is determined by my manager on a need by need basis.

    I am wondering how much notice my manager needs to give me to let me know the times and days I'm working?

    Usually he looks at this on a week to week basis but if a new event is given to us late in the week, I am told I must cover it. For example, this morning an event has been scheduled for Thursday afternoon which I've been told I must cover despite it being outside my normal working hours. This usually happens for events after 4pm (I typically work 7.30am - 3.30pm) and events on weekends.

    Is there a minimum amount of time my manager must give me for rescheduling my rota? Thank you .
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  • #2
    Re: How Late Can a Manager Give Rota?

    What does it say in your contract of employment about a) your contracted hours of work and b) how work is allocated c) does you contract mention a rota system and if so does your contract state how much notice you should be given for rota changes?

    I am trying to establish whether you are actually on a rota system or whether you work fixed hours and its the events that are scheduled into your working hours some of which may be know well in advance and some may be at shorter notice.

    However if you are on a true rota system then there is no legal minimum notice period to issue or change rotas in the workplace unless there is a statement to this fact in your contract or any workplace policies that are applicable. Your employer does have an implied duty of trust and confidence so they should provide you with ‘reasonable’ notice although this is not defined.
    I do my best to provide good practical advice, however I do so without liability.
    If you have any doubts then do please seek professional legal advice.


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